November 2010 Archives

The Hill
By: Robert Friedman & Eugene Steuerle
November 29, 2010

The American Dream has long meant the opportunity to buy a home, save for retirement, go to college, start a business and build an economic future for oneself and one's family. Small wonder that the federal government plans to spend $4 trillion during the coming decade to try to help us invest in our future. But, as noted by the co-chairs of the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform, we're pursuing this shared dream in ways that have become wasteful, regressive and ineffective. We recommend rebalancing our budget. We could cut the national debt by $500 billion or more over a decade, provide more effective subsidies for middle- and low-income families, boost private saving and reduce the demands on our welfare system. We could be on our way to a true "save and invest" economy.

Contra Costa Times (California)
By: Paula King
November 29, 2010

OAKLEY -- Andrea Luna is on the fast track to kindergarten readiness. The 3-year-old already can count to 20 and write her name.

Federal Pay Freeze Planned

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The Wall Street Journal
By: Jonathan Weisman & Damian Paletta
November 30, 2010

Obama Proposes Two-Year Raise Pause in Bid to Seize Agenda in Deficit Talks

WASHINGTON--President Barack Obama on Monday proposed a two-year salary freeze for all federal civilian employees, signaling an apparent willingness to reach toward Republicans ahead of negotiations on deficit-cutting that are likely to dominate Washington next year.

MSNBC
By: Paul Wiseman
November 30, 2010

Unemployment benefits boost growth because jobless spend every penny

WASHINGTON -- If Congress lets unemployment benefits expire this week, the jobless won't be the only ones to feel the pain. The overall economy would suffer, too.

The New York Times
By: Jenna Wortham
November 30, 2010

Chris Hughes, one of the founders of Facebook and the chief digital organizer for Barack Obama's presidential campaign, knows a thing or two about building online communities.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Kristen Gerencher
November 30, 2010

If you have been putting off considering a 529 college-savings plan for your child or grandchild, you might want to think again.

Bloomberg
By: Ryan J. Donmoyer
November 30, 2010

President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans plan to kick-start negotiations today at the White House over a possible extension of Bush-era tax cuts that are set to expire Dec. 31.

TakePart
November 24, 2010

The Fordham section of the Bronx is plagued by poverty, drugs and urban decay. The odds are stacked against children who attend Fordham's underfunded public schools.

The real problem: Income inequality

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CNNMoney.com
By: David Futrelle
November 24, 2010

(MONEY Magazine) -- Raghuram Rajan wasn't the only economist who warned of the financial crisis before it struck. He was, however, the sole one brave enough to make this prediction in front of Alan Greenspan at a 2005 Jackson Hole Conference devoted to celebrating the legacy of the once-seemingly infallible Fed chief.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Damian Paletta
November 29, 2010

The chairmen of the White House's debt-reduction commission are making last-minute changes to their provocative early draft in an effort to broaden support before a crucial Wednesday vote, people familiar with the matter said.

Democrats warm to tax-cut compromise

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The Washington Post
By: Lori Montgomery
November 29, 2010

A faction of congressional Democrats is making a push to persuade President Obama to consider a compromise on tax policy that would leave only the nation's 315,000 richest households facing higher taxes in January.

Baltimore Business Journal
By: Gary Haber
November 26, 2010

New strategy targets companies with less than $1M in revenue

M&T Bank is going after a segment of the market it says some of its competitors are ignoring - the very smallest of small businesses.

Winning the Class War

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The New York Times
By: Bob Herbert
November 26, 2010

The class war that no one wants to talk about continues unabated.

The Washington Post
By: Jackie Calmes
November 29, 2010

WASHINGTON -- As President Obama's fiscal commission faces a deadline this week for agreement on a plan to shrink the mounting national debt, liberal organizations will unveil debt-reduction proposals of their own in the next two days, seeking to sway the debate in favor of fewer reductions in domestic spending, more cuts in the military and higher taxes for the wealthy.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
By: Michael E. Kanell
November 28, 2010

Shifting economy is producing far fewer mid-skill jobs.

If the American middle class once offered dependable shelter, that haven now is shaky, leaky and uncertain.

The Washington Post
November 29, 2010

Associations/Nonprofits

Kirov Academy of Ballet of the District named Robert Lucas development director.

The Washington Post
By: Michael Birnbaum
November 23, 2010

In some struggling school districts around the country, students transferring from failing schools are overwhelming the few successful schools in their areas, an unintended byproduct of the No Child Left Behind law.

Your paycheck is about to shrink

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CNNMoney.com
By: Blake Ellis
November 24, 2010

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Are you ready to give up $30 a month?

MSNBC
November 23, 2010

President attempts to find middle ground with GOP ahead of Nov. 30 talk on Bush-era tax cuts

KOKOMO, Ind. -- U.S. President Barack Obama said Tuesday the United States must extend tax cuts for the middle class but could not afford to do so for the wealthy, laying out his position ahead of next week's meeting on the issue with Republicans.

The Washington Post
By: Ezra Klein
November 23, 2010

The sudden proliferation of deficit-reduction plans is a reminder that the deficit is, at its heart, a math problem. To get the budget into "primary balance" in 2015 - that's wonk-speak for a balanced budget before interest payments, and it's the target everyone is trying to hit - we need $225 billion in savings and new revenue. And you know what? That's not so hard.

Charity is not enough

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The News & Observer (North Carolina)
By: Rachel F. Seidman
November 24, 2010

The young man at the checkout counter politely informed me about Harris Teeter's fund drive for the local food bank and asked if I would donate money. I did. I couldn't load up my car with cranberries, potatoes and pie ingredients and ignore the fact that so many other people couldn't do the same.

What Good Is Wall Street?

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The New Yorker
By: John Cassidy
November 29, 2010

Much of what investment bankers do is socially worthless

For years, the most profitable industry in America has been one that doesn't design, build, or sell a single tangible thing.

What Good Is Wall Street?

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The New Yorker
By: John Cassidy
November 29, 2010

Much of what investment bankers do is socially worthless

For years, the most profitable industry in America has been one that doesn't design, build, or sell a single tangible thing.

Mission Loc@l (K2C)
By: Patricia Espinosa
November 23, 2010

This year every kindergartner from Cesar Chavez Elementary School and 18 other participating schools in San Francisco will have a college savings account in their name.

The Washington Post
By: Michael A. Fletcher
November 22, 2010

OCALA, FLA. - After losing his way in the old economy, Laurance Anton tried to assure his place in the new one by signing up for green jobs training earlier this year at his local community college.

The Atlanta Post
By: Weintana Abraha
November 22, 2010

The one commonality educators have regarding online schools, particularly cyber charter schools, is a passionate opinion about their contribution to American education. The politics and turf war between traditional (also known as brick-and-mortar) and online schools have made it difficult to collect public, non-partisan data on virtual charter schools and online education in general.

Food banks swamped by demand

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The Washington Post
By:Annie Gowen
November 22, 2010

The economy may be showing signs of life, but food pantries and other nonprofit food-distribution agencies around the region say they are struggling to meet record-breaking demand as the holidays approach.

State Tests Limits of Spending Cuts

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The Wall Street Journal
By: Deborah Solomon
November 22, 2010

JACKSON, Miss.--Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour hailed the Republican wave at the polls this month as a sign that voters want politicians who can cut spending and reduce taxes.

The Washington Post
By: Ariana Eunjung Cha and Brady Dennis
November 18, 2010

The financial services industry has launched an aggressive campaign on Capitol Hill to bolster the legality of the way companies have turned mortgages into securities and traded them across the globe in recent years.

The Huffington Post
By: Rep. Mike Honda
November 18, 2010

One of the challenges confronting education policy makers is staying connected to the grassroots. This is not only important for political purposes, but, most importantly, for policy implementation. What sounds great in the cloakrooms on Capitol Hill, or the conference rooms of D.C. policy shops, sometimes does not work on the ground. As a former high school teacher and principal, I am particularly sensitive to this dynamic, which is why I got back into the community again last week, visited schools across the nation, and spoke with some of the folks who are making it happen.

The Washington Post
By: Morris Panner
November 19, 2010

As a Democrat whose politics are undeniably liberal on social issues, I lamented the outcome of the midterm elections. But as an entrepreneur with two software start-ups under my belt, I couldn't help but celebrate - and more than a little. As the fall campaigns wore on, I had found myself listening closely to the Tea Party, nursing the hope that its message would push both major parties to change the way they do business.

NewsOk.com (Upside Down)
By: David Blatt
November 19, 2010

The co-chairmen of the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform rightly identified reform of tax expenditures as a major part of the solution to bringing the federal deficit under control. As a commission member, U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn could represent our best interests by seriously considering the recommendations to address revenues lost to tax expenditures. Nearly half of the $1 trillion in forgone revenue is supposed to help American families build wealth through homeownership, college education and small business. However, a new CFED report ("Upside Down: The $400 Billion Federal Asset-Building Budget") finds that major federal tax expenditures benefit the top 1 percent of households to the tune of $95,000 annually, while those earning less than $25,000 a year get an average annual benefit of just $5.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Justin Lahart & Mark Whitehouse
November 19, 2010

Fewer new businesses are getting off the ground in the U.S., available data suggest, a development that could cloud the prospects for job growth and innovation.

North County Times (California)
By: Ray Huard
November 14, 2010

Oceanside resident Luz Breceda yearned for a house where she could care for her 90-year-old mother in clean air and sunshine.

Jobless-Benefits Bill Rejected

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The Wall Street Journal
By: Janet Hook & Martin Vaughan
November 19, 2010

WASHINGTON--House Republicans Thursday torpedoed a bill to extend benefits for the long-term unemployed, pressing their demand that the $12 billion cost of continuing the program be offset rather than adding to the deficit.

Gates Urges School Budget Overhauls

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The New York Times
By: Sam Dillon
November 19, 2010

Bill Gates, the founder and former chairman of Microsoft, has made education-related philanthropy a major focus since stepping down from his day-to-day role in the company in 2008.

The Washington Post
By: Wil Haygood
November 19, 2010

FORT MYERS, FLA. -- Chrissanda Walker's bourbon-glazed chicken is just out of the oven. The bread pudding is finished. The collard greens worry her, though; she doesn't want to overcook them. Walker looks at the clock. It's 10 a.m. She's been on her feet since 6.

The Wall Street Journal
By: John Engler & Jerry Howard
November 17, 2010

The president says only the rich will be hit with the highest rates. Nonsense.

Speaking at his first cabinet meeting after the midterm election, President Obama repeated his familiar call for extending the current tax rates for middle-class families. He also vowed to support business. "We've got to provide businesses some certainty about what their tax landscape is going to look like, and we've got to provide families certainty," he said. "That's critical to maintain our recovery."

More Microloans for Small Businesses

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Kiplinger
By: Neema P. Roshania
November 18, 2010

Lenders that typically do business abroad are helping to fill a small-business lending gap made wider by the recession.

With small business lending by banks and other traditional money sources still tight, microlenders are picking up some of the slack by providing loans averaging about $7,000 to U.S. entrepreneurs struggling to start and maintain a business.

AOL News
By: Charles Wallace
November 18, 2010

Signs of a compromise are increasing in Washington on extending the Bush tax cuts for all income levels. The question is: Does it make good economic sense to continue them, or is this merely political expediency?

The Washington Post
By: David Ignatius
November 18, 2010

It's a strange populism that denounces Wall Street in one breath and, in the next, shouts down tax changes that would treat the financiers' incomes like those of everyday folks.

Students Forging Financial Futures

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Portland Press Herald (Maine)
By: Kelley Bouchard
November 17, 2010

EverFi, an interactive program, is helping kids learn the basics of handling credit, loans, debt and taxes.

Unlike many of his peers at Portland High School, Matt McInnis knows something about personal finance.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Martin Feldstein
November 18, 2010

Much of the projected doubling of the national debt between now and 2020 reflects the spending and tax proposals in the president's fiscal plan this year.

The stubbornly high unemployment rate is our economy's top problem today, but our exploding national debt is the more serious problem for the future. The recent proposal by Erskine Bowles and Alan Simpson, the chairmen of the bipartisan National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform, shows how difficult it will be to cut deficits and slow the growth of the national debt.

The Washington Post
By: Tim Craig
November 15, 2010

Two D.C. Council members from impoverished areas of the city are proposing to end cash payments to long-term welfare recipients to save tax dollars and encourage more of their constituents to find work.

The Huffington Post
By: Christine Armario
November 16, 2010

The Obama administration has pushed an ambitious education agenda in the last two years, sending $100 billion to states thorough the stimulus package and spurring reform in many locations through the Race to the Top competition.

NPR
By: John Ydstie
November 17, 2010

Unemployed workers face big hurdles as they try to get new jobs in today's economy. First, there's the numbers game: Close to 25 million workers unemployed or under-employed looking for jobs. In fact, there are five unemployed workers for every single job opening in the economy.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Amy Merrick, Conor Dougherty, & David Wessel
November 17, 2010

The U.S. government is now borrowing $5 billion every business day and has done nothing more than talk about a plan to reduce its debt. State governments don't have that luxury.

Business Wire
November 16, 2010

Gold Standard Applied Research Demonstrates Factors Critical in Enabling Low-Income Families to Achieve Financial Success; Inauguration of the ERI Coincides with Publication of White Paper and Website Relaunch

EARN , the nation's leading provider of microsavings for low-income workers, today established the EARN Research Institute (ERI) in order to advance the nation's capacity to put low-income workers and families on the path to prosperity.

Another Deficit Plan Targets Taxes

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The Wall Street Journal
By: Damian Paletta
November 17, 2010

A panel of Democrats, Republicans, economists and other experts is set to say Wednesday that a complete overhaul of the U.S. tax code is the best way to address the nation's fiscal problems--a new and likely controversial idea aimed at tackling the growing deficit.

Helping the poor save money

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Los Angeles Times
By: Kim Murphy
November 17, 2010

The Gates Foundation joins efforts with the global financial sector serving the needy.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation pledged $500 million Tuesday to help create new banking systems that will reach into the world's most impoverished corners and allow families earning $2 a day or less to begin saving money.

Los Angeles Times
By: Richard Fausset
November 16, 2010

Ending a bitter dispute over rebuilding priorities after Hurricane Katrina, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan announced Monday that they would make available $132 million in federal funds to help poor residents whose homes remained damaged.

Reserves Up at Home-Loan Agency

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The Wall Street Journal
By: Nick Timiraos
November 16, 2010

The Federal Housing Administration won't need a taxpayer bailout--at least for now.

The New York Times
By: Motoko Rich & Jack Ewing
November 15, 2010

A weakening currency traditionally helps a country raise its exports and create more jobs for its workers. But the declining value of the dollar may not help the United States increase economic growth as much as it might have in the past.

Bond Market Defies Fed

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The Wall Street Journal
By: Mark Gongloff
November 16, 2010

Interest Rates Rise Despite Launch of Treasury Buying as Investors Take Profits

Bucking the Federal Reserve's efforts to push interest rates lower, investors are selling off U.S. government debt, driving rates in many cases to their highest levels in more than three months.

SF Public Press (California)
By: Li Miao Lovett
November 15, 2010

In the community acupuncture room at Bu Tong Clinic, patients wait in silence away from the bustle of traffic and hawkers on Mission Street. The clinic owner, Julie Baumhofer, has seen her clientele grow as word about her low-fee acupuncture treatment continues to spread.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Janet Hook & Sara Murray
November 16, 2010

Congress is unlikely to agree to extend jobless benefits for two million unemployed workers by the time the program begins to lapse in two weeks, as lawmakers struggle with a packed lame-duck session and voter antipathy toward government spending.

The Stamford Advocate (Connecticut)
By: Maggie Gordon
November 15, 2010

STAMFORD -- Jack Bryant, president of the Stamford NAACP, is launching an exploratory committee to investigate the feasibility of an all-male charter school in Stamford.

Who Will Stand Up to the Superrich?

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The New York Times
By: Frank Rich
November 13, 2010

In the aftermath of the Great Democratic Shellacking of 2010, one election night subplot quickly receded into the footnotes: the drubbing received by very wealthy Americans, most of them Republican, who tried to buy Senate seats and governor's mansions. Americans don't hate rich people. They admire and often idolize success. But Californians took a hearty dislike to Meg Whitman, who sacrificed $143 million of her eBay fortune -- not to mention her undocumented former housekeeper -- to a gubernatorial race she lost by double digits. Connecticut voters K.O.'d the World Wrestling groin-kicker, Linda McMahon, and West Virginians did likewise to the limestone-and-steel magnate John Raese, the senatorial hopeful who told an interviewer without apparent irony, "I made my money the old-fashioned way -- I inherited it."

The Huffington Post
By: Christina Hoag
November 13, 2010

LOS ANGELES -- Four years ago, Francis Parkman Middle School was spiraling downward with plummeting enrollment, abysmal test scores and notoriety for unruliness. Then teachers stepped out of the classroom and took charge of the school.

NPR
By: John Ydstie
November 15, 2010

There's no shortage of dire numbers for job seekers these days: Nearly 15 million Americans are out of work, another 9 million are under-employed and the jobless rate seems to be stuck at 9.6 percent.

Fresh Attack on Fed Move

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The Wall Street Journal
By: Peter Wallsten & Sudeep Reddy
November 15, 2010

GOP Economists, Lawmakers Call for Abandoning $600 Billion Bond Purchase
WASHINGTON--The Federal Reserve's latest attempt to boost the U.S. economy is coming under fire from Republican economists and politicians, threatening to yank the central bank deeper into partisan politics.

USA TODAY
By: Cindy Perman
November 15, 2010

Small-town feel makes comeback

Homeownership has long been a symbol of the American dream, and for a while, we supersized it. But since the recession, we've been downsizing.

The Washington Post
By: Stephanie McCrummen
November 14, 2010

The next crop of would-be D.C. charter school operators gathered in a gray conference room on 14th Street one night last week, more than 30 hopeful men and women, each with his or her own pitch.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Tennille Tracy
November 15, 2010

Senior White House adviser David Axelrod said Sunday that the president won't support a permanent extension of tax cuts for wealthy Americans but declined to say whether the White House would support a temporary extension of tax cuts for those top earners.

The Star-Ledger (New Jersey)
By: Carmen Juri
November 14, 2010

Before the economic slump, Contina Wright and her family enjoyed the creature comforts of a middle-class lifestyle. Wright and her husband, a construction worker, spent money freely, vacationed, dined out regularly and had enough left over for savings.

The Huffington Post
By: Molly Secours
November 11, 2010

Yesterday after circling back to my house three times in a row on my way to a meeting because of a faulty memory, it occurred to me what a luxury and privilege it is to get four blocks from home and turn around to retrieve glasses and then a notebook -- and still be on time for an appointment.

The Haves vs. The Have-Nots

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Education Week
By: Eric J. Seymour
November 10, 2010

The Urgency Behind Narrowing the Gap in College-Entrance-Exam Scores

In August, Associated Press reporter Eric Gorski "Condition of Education" report, in which the proportion of high-poverty public schools jumped from 12 percent in 2000 to 17 percent in 2008, we start to get a clearer sense of why scores have declined nationally.

Keep Mortgage Tax Deduction

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American Banker
By: Kevin Villani
Novmber 12, 2010

The Treasury Department views all income not taxed as a tax-expenditure loophole to be closed, and the biggest of these is the home mortgage interest tax deduction. The National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform reports Dec. 1 and is likely to find the estimated tax revenue of $130 billion a year too tempting to resist.

Top Earners May Face Big Hit

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The Wall Street Journal
By: John D. McKinnon & Nick Timiraos
November 12, 2010

Proposed Elimination of Deductions, Investment Breaks Aims to Lift Tax Revenue

A presidential panel's draft overhaul of the tax system could hit higher earners hard, largely by wiping out deductions and investment breaks that tend to especially benefit those who make enough money to itemize their taxes.

SBA Helps Veteran-Owned Businesses

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CNBC
By: Michelle Lodge
November 11, 2010

Four years ago in Iraq, Justin Constantine took a bullet in his head that tore through his face.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Alan Zibel
November 12, 2010

Home prices fell in nearly half of U.S. metropolitan areas in the third quarter, indicating that the market is losing steam without government tax credits, according to an industry report.

Hartford Courant (Connecticut)
By: Grace E. Merritt
November 10, 2010

For students like Ashley Moran, 14, the door to college magically opened Tuesday when the city and Yale University announced that they would pay college tuition for every New Haven student who earns at least a B average.

Bloomberg News
By: Ryan J. Donmoyer
November 11, 2010

President Barack Obama will agree to Republican demands that Bush-era tax policies benefiting high- income Americans be extended, his top adviser said in an interview with the Huffington Post.

Spiegel Online International
November 10, 2010

American society is breaking apart. Millions of people have lost their jobs and fallen into poverty. Among them, for the first time, are many middle-class families. Meet Pam Brown from New York, whose life changed overnight.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Sarah E. Needleman
November 11, 2010

Several new programs that aim to help military family members and veterans start businesses were announced this week ahead of Thursday's observance of Veteran's Day.

Deficit Panel Pushes Cuts

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The Wall Street Journal
By: John D. McKinnon, Corey Boles & Martin Vaughan
November 11, 2010

Plan to Save $3.8 Trillion Targets Medicare, Pentagon, Middle-Class Tax Breaks

WASHINGTON--A White House commission laid out a sweeping proposal to cut the federal budget deficit by hundreds of billions a year by targeting sacrosanct areas of U.S. tax and spending policy, such as Social Security benefits, middle-class tax breaks and defense spending.

USA Today
By: Dennis Cauchon
November 10, 2010

The number of federal workers earning $150,000 or more a year has soared tenfold in the past five years and doubled since President Obama took office, a USA TODAY analysis finds.
The fast-growing pay of federal employees has captured the attention of fiscally conservative Republicans who won control of the U.S. House of Representatives in last week's elections. Already, some lawmakers are planning to use the lame-duck session that starts Monday to challenge the president's plan to give a 1.4% across-the-board pay raise to 2.1 million federal workers.

The Boston Herald
By: Rochelle Stewart Rubino
November 9, 2010

Tough economic times can force some college students to put their education on the back burner. But a new financial aid program offered at Bunker Hill Community College (and expected soon at other colleges) aims to help students cover expenses that would otherwise cause them to drop courses for a semester or two - delaying their graduation.

The Associated Press
By: Christopher S. Rugaber
November 10, 2010

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Fewer people applied for unemployment aid last week, the third drop in four weeks and evidence that the job market is showing signs of life.

The Huffington Post
By: Reid Cramer
November 9, 2010

Take a look at the poverty numbers recently released by the Census Bureau. Almost 44 million Americans were reported to live in poverty last year. That's the highest number (with the largest yearly increase) since the Census Bureau began tracking poverty in 1959. In some ways, these numbers are depressing, but not necessarily surprising. After all, 2009 was a bad year. Scores of workers dropped out of the labor force, unemployment reached 10%, almost 3 million families lost their homes, and over 4 million people lost their health insurance. These numbers tell us about the breadth of the recession, but here's a chilling fact: over 1 in 5 children spent the year in poverty.

Extending Tax Cuts, but With a Catch

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The Wall Street Journal
By: John D. McKinnon
November 10, 2010

Top Democrats Link Keeping Bush-Era Breaks to an Overhaul of Tax Code; Republican Aides Say They Are Open to the Idea.

WASHINGTON--Two top Senate Democrats floated the idea Tuesday of extending the Bush-era income-tax rates for a limited time only, and tying that move to an overhaul of the U.S. tax code or passage of policies to address the budget deficit.

Many still betting on homeownership

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The Dallas Morning News (Texas)
By: Steve Brown
November 9, 2010

NEW ORLEANS - Despite the housing crash, most American homebuyers still think they are making a smart financial move.

The Washington Post
By: Bill Turque
November 7, 2010

The two Southeast Washington middle schools are less than a mile apart. The real distance that separates them is the number of hours their students spend in class each week.

Miami students get urban immersion

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Cincinnati.com
By: Krista Ramsey
November 8, 2010

Rothenberg Preparatory Academy principal Alesia Smith says she can spot an urban teacher in an instant.

Low Rates Hurt Bonds for Housing

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The New York Times
By: Diana B. Henriques
November 9, 2010

It is not just retired savers who are struggling with a sharp reduction in their investment income as interest rates hover near zero. Hundreds of affordable housing projects across the country are feeling the pain, too.

The Baltimore Sun (Maryland)
By: Eileen Ambrose
November 9, 2010

Borrow and save program aims to break cycle of payday loans

When Roy Miller couldn't afford to pay cash for furniture for his new Belair-Edison home last year, he didn't have to resort to a credit card or some other pricey form of borrowing.

CBS moneywatch.com
By: Jane Bryant Quinn
November 9, 2010

Obama's signature tax cut for middle class -- titled Making Work Pay -- expires at the end of this year. Republicans show no interest in renewing it. As a result, working-class and middle-class earners will pay a bit more in taxes in 2011, even if the Bush-era tax cuts are left in place.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Conor Dougherty & Luca Di Leo
November 9, 2010

The credit crunch is easing in the U.S. but it's far from over.

The Los Angeles Times
By: E. Scott Reckard
November 8, 2010

Progreso Financiero is growing fast by lending to dishwashers and factory workers, regardless of their immigration status.

Education Week
By: Mary Ann Zehr
November 8, 2010

Collaborations popping up across the country between charter and traditional public schools show promise that charter schools could fulfill their original purpose of becoming research-and-development hothouses for public education, champions of charters say.

Our Banana Republic

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The New York Times
By: Nicholas D. Kristof
November 6, 2010

In my reporting, I regularly travel to banana republics notorious for their inequality. In some of these plutocracies, the richest 1 percent of the population gobbles up 20 percent of the national pie.

The Niagara Gazette (New York)
By: Michele Deluca
November 07, 2010

NIAGARA FALLS -- When the popular television show, "Extreme Makeover" used modular home pieces to make a group home for gifted, at-risk students, that style of home-building took a few more steps forward in public perception.

Tax System Favors Wealth Over Work

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Truthout
By: Gerald E. Scorse
November 7, 2010

Tea Partiers rage against taxes and say they're too high. Wrong, says billionaire Warren Buffett: on the rich, they're too low.

The Wall Street Journal
By: John D. McKinnon & Damian Paletta
November 8, 2010

Newly empowered Republicans pushed Sunday to extend Bush-era tax levels for as long as possible and pledged significant cuts in spending, as President Barack Obama sought to maintain his footing in an escalating budget battle.

Economy Adds 151,000 Jobs

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The Wall Street Journal
By: Luca Di Leo & Jeffrey Sparshott
November 5, 2010

The U.S. economy added jobs in October for the first time since May as private-sector hiring picked up, but the unemployment rate remained elevated.

The Washington Post
By: Jeremy Olson
November 3, 2010

MINNEAPOLIS - Jessica Peltier and her boyfriend sure look like a married couple - they live together, drive their 3-year-old daughter to dance class at the YMCA and bicker over laundry or empty cans sitting around.

The Crisis in Public Housing

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The New York Times
November 4, 2010

After nearly two decades of weak financing from Congress, a large number of the public housing developments that shelter 2.3 million of the nation's poorest, most vulnerable people are falling apart.

Boost for Keeping All Bush Tax Cuts

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The Wall Street Journal
By: John D. McKinnon & Janet Hook
November 5, 2010

President Barack Obama is open to considering the extension of all Bush-era tax cuts for a year or two, the White House confirmed Thursday, putting to a likely end any debate over whether to extend the breaks for high-income families.

The Seattle Times (Washington)
By: Bob Herbert
November 2, 2010

The hyperconcentration of wealth and income, and the overwhelming political clout it has put into the hands of the moneyed interests, writes Bob Herbert, has drastically eroded the capacity of government to respond to the needs of the middle class and others of modest income.

The clearest explanation yet of the forces that converged over the past three decades or so to undermine the economic well-being of ordinary Americans is contained in the new book, "Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer -- and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class."

The Washington Post
By: Michelle Singletary
November 3, 2010

In an economy that is still as rocky as the Grand Canyon, many people remain perplexed about what they should do if they find themselves without a job or on the verge of losing one soon.

Kiplinger
By: Jerome Idaszak
November 3, 2010

More folks than ever before have been out of a job for a year or more. The prognosis for them isn't good. And that spells bad news for the economy.

It's likely to take five or more years for the ranks of the long-term unemployed to return to a more normal level. With the unemployment rate remaining stubbornly high and job creation anemic, the number of would-be wage earners who have been out of work for a year or more is ballooning. It's risen from 668,000 when the recession began at the end of 2007 to the current tally of 4.3 million -- nearly 3% of the labor force and almost three times the previous post-World War II high of 1% in 1982.

Broken Arrow Ledger (Oklahoma)
By: Nour Habib
November 3, 2010

"Citizens, we have a busy day today."

The Huffington Post
By: Dory Rand
November 3, 2010

Richard Otero-Cintrón is the kind of person who knows how to seize an opportunity when he sees one. It's how he became the owner of North Chicago Auto Service after starting out in 1990 as the maintenance man who swept the floors and made sure the windows were clean. Over the course of fifteen years, Otero-Cintrón earned the trust of the shop's previous owner through his dedication and loyalty. When the previous owner passed away because of pancreatic cancer five years ago, he left Otero-Cintrón ownership of 25 percent of the business and the rest to his widow.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Emily Maltby
November 3, 2010

Thirty minutes is set on a glowing timer at the far end of a vast conference room. Forty entrepreneurs walk in, and each takes a seat at a small table where a business counselor is waiting.

The Dallas Morning News (Texas)
By: Sheryl Jean
November 3, 2010

Michelle Matta had never heard of microfinancing before landing a microloan.After working for a promotional products company for eight years, she decided to branch out on her own. In 2007, she started A Turtle Loves Me, using her husband's nickname.

The Wall Street Journal
By: Jon Hilsenrath
November 4, 2010

The Federal Reserve, in a dramatic effort to rev up a "disappointingly slow" economic recovery, said it will buy $600 billion of U.S. government bonds over the next eight months to drive down interest rates and encourage more borrowing and growth.

The Huffington Post
By: Stephen Salinas
November 2, 2010

Marta, a mother of a sixth-grade student at John Liechty Middle School, came up to me the other day with a question. Through the grapevine, she had heard of a program where people in bright jackets gave children heroes and make the community better and she wanted to know how her daughter could get involved. She lives in the Pico-Union neighborhood of Los Angeles, where I oversee the City Year program at five public middle schools, and despite the constant ebb and flow of Latino immigrant families in and out of the area, there is a strong sense community in place. And in this community, chisme -- gossip -- travels faster than the news on the airwaves.

The Dallas Morning News (Texas)
By: Laurie Fox
November 1, 2010

Ian Anderson knows there are high school students who can't grasp a difficult math or physics concept or who are stymied by conjugating Spanish verbs.

The Associated Press
By: Paul Wiseman
November 2, 2010

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Political gridlock is supposed to be good for business. If bickering lawmakers can't agree on anything, the thinking goes, they can't pass laws and regulations that make the economy worse.

MSNBC.com
By: John W. Schoen
November 1, 2010

Adversity Index shows national statistics mask wide range of jobless rates

The U.S. economy may technically have emerged from recession, but in most parts of the country, it's still just bumping along the bottom.

The San Francisco Chronicle (California)
By: Julian Guthrie
November 3, 2010

The question posed to the San Francisco eighth-graders was: "Have you ever been ripped off?"

The New York Times
By: David Leonhardt
November 2, 2010

WASHINGTON -- The Bush tax cuts expire in 58 days.

The Huffington Post
By: Mike Green
November 2, 2010

While Americans focus on the results of the midterm election, something far more important is at stake. A large segment of America is in the midst of an economic and education crisis that threatens to relegate a vast majority of our future generations to the front seat of the bus: the driver's seat.

Fast Track to Inequality

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The New York Times
By: Bob Herbert
November 1, 2010

The clearest explanation yet of the forces that converged over the past three decades or so to undermine the economic well-being of ordinary Americans is contained in the new book, "Winner-Take-All Politics: How Washington Made the Rich Richer -- and Turned Its Back on the Middle Class."

The Wall Street Journal
By: Damian Paletta
November 2, 2010

The White House and Capitol Hill are preparing for post-election chaos over a host of unresolved economic issues, from taxes to jobless benefits, potentially prolonging what has been a lengthy period of uncertainty for taxpayers and businesses.

Refinance in Under a Year? Maybe

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The Wall Street Journal
By: Amy Hoak
November 2, 2010

'Window of Opportunity' Opens for Some as Mortgage Rates Hover Near Lows

Low mortgage rates have some homeowners considering refinancing, even if it has been less than a year since they last refinanced or bought their home.

Journalism Center on Children & Families
October 29, 2010

The U.S. government has a history of helping families built assets. In fiscal year 2009, the federal government spent nearly $400 billion on policies that aimed to help families buy homes, run businesses and save for their children's education. A new report by the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Corporation for Enterprise Development finds that these policies are slanted toward the wealthy and hurt low-and middle-income households.

Sacramento Bee (California)
By: Darrell Smith
October 31, 2010

ENTREPRENEURS HAVE ALTERNATE SOURCE AS PRIVATE LENDERS BALK

Microloans -- small, short-term loans to small businesses -- are getting a federal cash infusion that will give firms more access to the loans.

Orange County Register (California)
October 28, 2010

There was one thing on Carol West's mind last month as she traversed Orange County by bus, from morning to afternoon, searching for a job.

MSNBC.com
By: Andrew Taylor
October 31, 2010

President has not said whether he would veto a bill that extends the tax cuts for everyone

WASHINGTON -- Will Congress extend the Bush tax cuts into 2011 in the weeks after Tuesday's election or let the automatic increase start cutting into most people's paychecks early next year?

The Education Manifesto

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The Wall Street Journal
By: Michelle Rhee & Adrian Fenty
October 30, 2010

Michelle Rhee and Adrian Fenty on what they learned while pushing to reform D.C.'s failing public schools.

Our time in office and in charge of the school system of Washington, D.C., is quickly drawing to an end. Monday is Michelle's last day as schools chancellor, and Mayor Fenty failed to win the Democratic primary last month. A new mayor will be elected next week.

The Nonprofit Quarterly
By: Rick Cohen
November 01, 2010

There is something missing in the Dodd-Frank Act's comprehensive financial services regulation bill--in addition to not dealing with the looming problem of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. That something missing is the long-overdue review and overhaul of the Community Reinvestment Act. What's more, with a potential change in the composition of Congress after November 2, it might be that a deadlock between the two houses of Congress, or between Congress and the White House, stymies the "modernization" of CRA.

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